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Thursday, April 20, 2017

THIS WEEK IN PICTURES

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

PRAGER UNIVERSITY: There is No Gender Wage Gap

"Give us five-minutes and we’ll give you a semester." - Dennis Prager

This semester of Prager University is presented by:  Christina Hoff Sommers

"The small wage gape, that does exist, has nothing to do with paying women less, let alone with sexism.  It has to do with differences in individual career choices, that men and women make...Those who claim that for the same work women earn 77-cents on the dollar compared to men, on the other hand, are not merely bad at math, but at telling the truth." – C.H.S.



"If for the same work women only make 77-cents for every dollar a man makes, why don't businesses hire only women?" - C.H.S.

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Sunday, April 16, 2017

THIS (past) WEEK IN PICTURES

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Happy Easter


Reposted from Wilstar

As with almost all "Christian" holidays, Easter has been secularized and commercialized. The dichotomous nature of Easter and its symbols, however, is not necessarily a modern fabrication.

Since its conception as a holy celebration in the second century, Easter has had its non-religious side. In fact, Easter was originally a pagan festival.

The ancient Saxons celebrated the return of spring with an uproarious festival commemorating their goddess of offspring and of springtime, Eastre. When the second-century Christian missionaries encountered the tribes of the north with their pagan celebrations, they attempted to convert them to Christianity. They did so, however, in a clandestine manner.

It would have been suicide for the very early Christian converts to celebrate their holy days with observances that did not coincide with celebrations that already existed. To save lives, the missionaries cleverly decided to spread their religious message slowly throughout the populations by allowing them to continue to celebrate pagan feasts, but to do so in a Christian manner.

As it happened, the pagan festival of Eastre occurred at the same time of year as the Christian observance of the Resurrection of Christ. It made sense, therefore, to alter the festival itself, to make it a Christian celebration as converts were slowly won over. The early name, Eastre, was eventually changed to its modern spelling, Easter.

The Date of Easter

Prior to A.D. 325, Easter was variously celebrated on different days of the week, including Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. In that year, the Council of Nicaea was convened by emperor Constantine. It issued the Easter Rule which states that Easter shall be celebrated on the first Sunday that occurs after the first full moon on or after the vernal equinox. However, a caveat must be introduced here. The "full moon" in the rule is the ecclesiastical full moon, which is defined as the fourteenth day of a tabular lunation, where day 1 corresponds to the ecclesiastical New Moon. It does not always occur on the same date as the astronomical full moon. The ecclesiastical "vernal equinox" is always on March 21.

Therefore, Easter must be celebrated on a Sunday between the dates of March 22 and April 25.

The Cross

The Cross is the symbol of the Crucifixion, as opposed to the Resurrection. However, at the Council of Nicaea, in A.D. 325, Constantine decreed that the Cross was the official symbol of Christianity. The Cross is not only a symbol of Easter, but it is more widely used, especially by the Catholic Church, as a year-round symbol of their faith.

The Easter Bunny

The Easter Bunny is not a modern invention. The symbol originated with the pagan festival of Eastre. The goddess, Eastre, was worshipped by the Anglo-Saxons through her earthly symbol, the rabbit.

The Germans brought the symbol of the Easter rabbit to America. It was widely ignored by other Christians until shortly after the Civil War. In fact, Easter itself was not widely celebrated in America until after that time.

The Easter Egg

As with the Easter Bunny and the holiday itself, the Easter Egg predates the Christian holiday of Easter. The exchange of eggs in the springtime is a custom that was centuries old when Easter was first celebrated by Christians.

From the earliest times, the egg was a symbol of rebirth in most cultures. Eggs were often wrapped in gold leaf or, if you were a peasant, colored brightly by boiling them with the leaves or petals of certain flowers.

Today, children hunt colored eggs and place them in Easter baskets along with the modern version of real Easter eggs - those made of plastic or chocolate candy.

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Friday, April 14, 2017

Income Redistribution Day: Like the 4th of July for Liberals


"It's that time of year again. Uncle Sam takes off that gaudy blue coat, puts on his white smock and snaps that all-too-familiar rubber glove into place. And we, the taxpayers, must gird ourselves for intrusions of proctological magnitude and glacial duration by the revenuers...Yes, I want to keep more of my money - because it's mine. But there are people who don't see it that way. The problem with those people isn't simply that they're wrong. It's that they are in charge." - Jonah Goldberg


"Some taxpayers close their eyes, some stop their ears, some shut their mouths, but all pay through the nose." – Evan Esar

LIBERAL THEME SONG

"Be thankful I don't take it all."


"You see, here in America there's a reason why we celebrate the 4th of July and not April 15th, because in America we celebrate our independence from the government, not our dependence on it." - Governor Scott Walker

Walker's comment was very true for much of America's history...Unfortunately, this has become only about 50% true in our time - where almost 50% of the American people are either dependent on the government (tax payers) or want to be the overlords doling out the sticks and carrots to those who are dependent on them.  And make no mistake, there are just as many sticks as carrots - sticks which are a lot bigger than the carrots.



"One thing is clear: The Founding Fathers never intended a nation where citizens would pay nearly half of everything they earn to the government." – Ron Paul

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Thursday, April 13, 2017

Good Friday


Good Friday is the Friday before Easter. It commemorates the execution of Jesus by crucifixion and is a day of mourning in church. During special Good Friday services Christians meditate on Jesus's suffering and death on the cross, and what this means for their faith.

On Good Friday, the entire Church fixes her gaze on the Cross at Calvary. Each member of the Church tries to understand at what cost Christ has won our redemption. In the solemn ceremonies of Good Friday, in the Adoration of the Cross, in the chanting of the 'Reproaches', in the reading of the Passion, and in receiving the pre-consecrated Host, we unite ourselves to our Savior, and we contemplate our own death to sin in the Death of our Lord.

The Church - stripped of its ornaments, the altar bare, and with the door of the empty tabernacle standing open - is as if in mourning. In the fourth century the Apostolic Constitutions described this day as a "day of mourning, not a day of festive joy", and this day was called the "Pasch (passage) of the Crucifixion."

The liturgical observance of this day of Christ's suffering, crucifixion and death evidently has been in existence from the earliest days of the Church. No Mass is celebrated on this day, but the service of Good Friday is called the Mass of the Presanctified because Communion (in the species of bread), which had already been consecrated on Holy Thursday, is given to the people.

Traditionally, the organ is silent from Holy Thursday until the Alleluia at the Easter Vigil, as are all bells or other instruments, the only music during this period being unaccompanied chant.

The omission of the prayer of consecration deepens our sense of loss because Mass throughout the year reminds us of the Lord's triumph over death, the source of our joy and blessing. The desolate quality of the rites of this day reminds us of Christ's humiliation and suffering during his Passion.

In some countries, there are special Good Friday processions, or re-enactments of the Crucifixion.

The Bible quotes seven last sentences Jesus spoke from the Cross:


"Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing." - Luke 23:34
"Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise." - Luke 23 :43
"Woman, here is your son...Here is your mother." - John 19:26
"Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?" ("My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?") - Mark 15:34
"I am thirsty." - John 19:28
"It is finished." - John 19:30
"Father, into your hands I commend my spirit." - Luke 23:46

Reposted from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/holydays/goodfriday.shtml  (A dead link)

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Monday, April 10, 2017

PRAGER UNIVERSITY: Love Needs Laughs

"We teach what isn’t taught." - Dennis Prager

This semester of Prager University is presented by:  Yakov Smirnoff

"Couples who laugh together, last together." – Dr. John Gottman


"[W]hen there is a genuine connection between people, laughter is the first thing that happens as a confirmation of a happy relationship...The fading away of laughter may be the best way to tell if your relationship has gone off course...Of course, marriages and relationships break up for all sorts of reasons, but I can say with confidence:  If you're not laughing there's trouble ahead." – Y.S.

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Sunday, April 09, 2017

Passover (Pesach)



For my Jewish friends...I am not Jewish, but it's important for non-Jews who celebrate America to recognize there is no America-as-we-know-it without the Judean portion of this great Judeo-Christian nation.
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Begins: Jewish Year 5777 (sunset April 10, 2017) – Ends: (nightfall April 18, 2017)

Of all the Jewish holidays, Pesach is the one most commonly observed, even by otherwise non-observant Jews.

Pesach begins on the 15th day of the Jewish month of Nissan. It is the first of the three major festivals with both historical and agricultural significance (the other two are Shavu'ot and Sukkot). Agriculturally, it represents the beginning of the harvest season in Israel, but little attention is paid to this aspect of the holiday. The primary observances of Pesach are related to the Exodus from Egypt after generations of slavery. This story is told in Exodus, Ch. 1-15. Many of the Pesach observances are instituted in Chs. 12-15.

The name "Pesach" (PAY-sahch, with a "ch" as in the Scottich "loch") comes from the Hebrew root Peh-Samech-Chet , meaning to pass through, to pass over, to exempt or to spare. It refers to the fact that G-d "passed over" the houses of the Jews when he was slaying the firstborn of Egypt. In English, the holiday is known as Passover. "Pesach" is also the name of the sacrificial offering (a lamb) that was made in the Temple on this holiday. The holiday is also referred to as Chag he-Aviv , (the Spring Festival), Chag ha-Matzot , (the Festival of Matzahs), and Z'man Cheiruteinu , (the Time of Our Freedom) (again, all with those Scottish "ch"s).

“And if your son asks you in the future, saying, What are the testimonies, and the statutes, and the judgments, that the L-RD our G-d commanded you? You will say to your son, We were slaves to Pharaoh in Egypt; and the L-RD brought us out of Egypt with a mighty hand. The L-RD gave signs and wonders, great and harmful, against Egypt, against Pharaoh, and against all his household, before our eyes: And he brought us out of there to bring us in, to give us the land that he promised our fathers.” -Deuteronomy 6:20-23

Reposted From: Judaism 101

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Saturday, April 08, 2017

Palm Sunday


For my Catholic family and friends...I'd like to point out, I'm not Christian, but am Catholic-through-osmosis.
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Palm Sunday is the sixth Sunday of Lent and the last Sunday before Easter. It is also known as Passion Sunday, Willow Sunday, and Flower Sunday.

Palm Sunday commemorates the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, where he would be crucified five days later. According to the Gospels, Jesus rode into town on a donkey as exuberant crowds hailed him as the Messiah and spread out palm branches and cloaks in his path.

The event commemorated on Palm Sunday is told in all four gospels (Matthew 21, Mark 11, Luke 19, John 12). The Matthew narrative, the one most commonly read in services on Palm Sunday, tells the story this way:

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, "Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, tell him that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away... 

The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them. They brought the donkey and the colt, placed their cloaks on them, and Jesus sat on them. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted, "Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!"

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred and asked, "Who is this?" the crowds answered, "This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galillee." - (Matthew 21:1-3, 6-11)

The celebration of Palm Sunday probably originated in the churches of Jerusalem, sometime before the third or fourth century AD.

Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week, an especially solemn and important week in the Christian calendar that focuses on the last days of Jesus' life and anticipates Easter, the most important holiday in Christianity.

Common Palm Sunday observances include processions with palm branches, the blessing of palms (which will be burned and used on Ash Wednesday), and the construction of small palm crosses. Bible readings for the "Liturgy of the Palms" usually include Matthew 21:1-11 and Psalm 118:19-29.

Reposted from: Religion Facts

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Thursday, April 06, 2017

THIS WEEK IN PICTURES

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